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SpinWeb is an Indianapolis-based digital agency, specializing in enterprise website design & digital marketing

How to Organize and Write Content for Your New Website

Posted by Stephanie Fisher on 6/21/16 9:30 AM

woman-writing-laptop.jpg

Here at SpinWeb, we often hear clients saying "I'm not sure where to start when it comes to writing website copy."

Perhaps it brings horrible flashbacks of high school research papers—but wait! When you're trying to write content for your website, you need to embrace those dusty research paper writing skills. (Just when you thought it was safe to forget everything you learned in high school English class, it's all coming back to you now.)

1. Start with the Sitemap

It's not rocket science, but this is always the question I get with folks in the content meeting: How do I organize all the content? What do I DO?! I get it, the task feels overwhelming which is why you take it step by step. Just start a Google or Word doc with an outline, and take a deep breath.

This should be the overview of all your website's content. You should have a general idea of what the structure should be. Organize this first.  It can look something like this sitemap, which we construct with our clients during the planning and strategy phase of a new website project:

sitemap-example.png


Go through each page and do the following:

  • Determine the goal for the page — There might be multiple goals, and that's okay. If you get into three or more, though, you should start thinking about multiple pages.

  • Write it down— Be specific; write down all the information a user would need to reach the stated goal. This doesn't need to be pretty—we just need the bare bones.

  • What do you want to see?—Write down all of the visual components you would like to see on the page. 

2. Outline each page

Starting with the sitemap you've created, the main points of your outline will be the top level navigation of your sitemap and you'll drill down to individual pages from there. For instance, In the About Us section, you will have several pages about your company. Include the key components of each page in the outline. 

This not only helps you organize the words on the page, but now you know exactly what images you'll need to gather, what CTAs you want to include, bios of team members, and other items that you might want to add to this list.

About Us: Webpage

  • Content to Include: Overview of Your Company, what you do
  • Call to Action: Subscribe
  • Image: Office Building
Mission: Webpage
  • Content to Include: Mission Statement
  • Call to Action: Subscribe
  • Image: Team members

History: Webpage

  • Content to Include: Timeline of Company
  • Call to Action: Subscribe
  • Image: Historic photos A, B, and C

Team: Personnel Directory

  • Content to Include [Lister]: Name, image, title, bio
  • Call to Action: Contact Us
  • Image: Team Photo

3. Write

Now that you have an outline, this is where the creative writing component comes in. Break out your thesaurus, and let the words flow. 

If the thought of writing makes you break out in hives, or if the task seem too daunting to tackle, you're in luck! The work you did in step 2 has saved your bacon! This is the information that you can pass along to your partner or writing team. You've done your homework, so you can relax while the writers do theirs. 

Don't forget your SEO Basics as you write the content for your website – Download this Cheat Sheet!

4. Polish

This is the point where you refine the prose that you (or your writing team) worked so hard to create. Add the perfect images, check the font size and spacing, and look for any spelling or grammar errors. Make it look perfect, and then you can sit back and wait for the public to discover your glorious new website.

Create Web Content That Converts

Topics: web design, content management

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